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dc.contributor.authorKelly, Tim
dc.contributor.authorFirestone, Rachel
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-22T12:23:14Z
dc.date.available2017-11-22T12:23:14Z
dc.date.issued2015-11
dc.identifier.issn2223-7062
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.ubuntunet.net/handle/10.20374/214
dc.description.abstractDigital technologies have spread rapidly. Digital dividends—the broader development benefits from using these technologies—have not. Digital technologies to benefit everyone everywhere requires improving the “analog” complements to digital investments—by strengthening regulations that ensure competition among businesses, by adapting workers’ skills to the demands of the new economy, and by ensuring that institutions are accountable. Inclusion, efficiency, innovation are the main mechanisms for the Internet to promote development. How can these mechanisms be leveraged to promote Africa’s development? The paper tracks some 117 Tech Hubs across Africa, many of which have been created in the last few years. The paper looks at the patterns of origin by which Tech Hubs are created, why they have a high failure rate, and what makes for success.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherUbuntuNet Allianceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesProceedings and Report of the UbuntuNet Alliance Annual Conference;8
dc.subjectICT for Developmenten_US
dc.subjectTech Hubsen_US
dc.subjectAcademic Collaborationen_US
dc.subjectIndustry Collaborationen_US
dc.subjectAfricaen_US
dc.subjectWorld Development Reporten_US
dc.subjectEconomic Growthen_US
dc.titleHow Tech Hubs are helping to drive economic growth in Africa: Background report for World Bank: World Development Report 2016: Digital Dividendsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.typePresentationen_US


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